Posted by: anna | August 2, 2011

St Severa

Today (20 July) in the rather quiet calendar of early western saints we commemorate St Severa of Trier, abbess of St Gemma, and her later namesake at another convent in Trier. To clarify (a bit), Trier and Trèves are the same place. From orthodoxengland:
Severa July 20, + c 680. Sister of St Modoald, Bishop of Trier in Germany. First Abbess of St Gemma (later Sainte-Sevère) in Villeneuve near Bourges in France.

Severa July 20, + c 750. Abbess of the convent of Oehren in Trier (St. Irminen in Öhren in Trier) in Germany.
The 7th century Severa is also mentioned as abbess of the convent of St Symphorian at Trier. Once again a fair amount of confusion in the various half-digested sources.

heiligen.net (in Dutch)
Devout sister of Bishop St Modoald of Trier,
You became the first abbess of the monastery
of St Gemma in the diocese of Bourges,
leading your nuns into the Kingdom of God
in ascesis, fasting and prayer.

Saint Severa, beseech Christ to save us!

Sœur très dévote de saint Modoald de Trèves,
Tu devins la première higoumène au couvent*
De sainte Gemme dans le diocèse de Bourges,*
Menant tes moniales au Royaume de Dieu*
Dans l’ascèse, dans le jeûne et dans la prière.*
Sainte Sévère, prie le Christ de nous sauver!

Posted by: anna | August 1, 2011

Pope St Symmachus

Today (19 July) in the calendar of early western saints we commemorate St Symmachus, Orthodox Pope from 498 to 514. His tenure was marked by an unedifying row about how popes were legitimately elected. At the very end of a long description of the political toings and froings and struggles with various kinds of heresy throughout the Empire, the Catholic Encyclopedia mentions some of his more practical local actions as Bishop of Rome, which are picked up in the troparion below.
Ton 5 Tropaire à saint Symmaque, Pape orthodoxe, (Natalice en 514 A.D.)

 
Evêque de Rome, ami de Constantinople,*
Tu dus lutter contre le schisme dans l’Eglise.*
Tu fus la providence pour les délaissés,*
Œuvrant pour soulager les misères humaines,*
Et accueillir les pèlerins venus à Rome.*
Saint Symmaque, prie le Seigneur de nous sauver!
Bishop of Rome, friend of Constantinople,
You were required to battle against the schism in the Church.
You provided for the welfare of the neglected,
Working to relieve human misery
And to welcome the pilgrims who came to Rome.
St Symmachus, pray to the Lord to save us!
 
Posted by: anna | July 29, 2011

troparia for July 16

A quiet day on the British calendar; I’ve updated St Helier’s post with a troparion, and here are a couple  more for today from Acathistes et offices orthodoxes.

Ton 5 Tropaire à saint Domnin, martyr, (natalice au 3ème siècle)

L’Ecriture dit que la louange parfaite,*

Est issue de la bouche des petits enfants.*

Saint Domnin, tu n’étais âgé que de dix ans,*

Lorsque tu fus crucifié en haine du Christ,*

Avec d’autres chrétiens à Avrilly dans l’Eure.*
Saint innocent, prie le Seigneur de nous sauver!

Scripture says that perfect praise

Comes from the mouths of little children.

St Domninus, you were only ten years old

When you were crucified by those who hated Christ

With other Christians at Avrilly in the Eure, in Normandy.

Holy innocent, pray to the Lord to save us!

The relics of St Dominin were translated to Puy-en-Velay in the Auvergne.

+

Ton 6 Tropaire à saint Généroux, higoumène, (Natalice au 6ème siècle)

Romain de naissance, tu te fis religieux*

Au monastère sacré de saint Jouin de Marne.*

Tes éminentes qualités spirituelles,*

Te firent bientôt élire comme higoumène.*

Saint Généroux, toi qui es auprès du Seigneur,*

Prie-Le d’avoir de nos âmes grande mercy!

Roman by birth, you became a monk

At the holy monastery of St Jouin of Marne.

Your distinguished spiritual qualities

Soon caused you to be elected abbot.

St Generosus, you who are close to the Lord,

Pray to Him to have great mercy on our souls!

=====
celt-saints adds for today:
‘St. Sinach MacDara, 6th century. The only reference I can find to Sinach is that the fisherman traditionally gathered on the island of MacDara for an annual Mass. It is still customary to dip sails or make the Sign of Cross when passing the island (Montague).
‘St. Tenenan (Tininor) of Leon, Bishop. Born in Britain; died c. 635. Tenenan was a priest who became a hermit in Brittany and later bishop of Leon. He probably died at Ploabennec, where he had built a forest hermitage and where his relics were long venerated (Benedictines, Farmer).’
===
And another source, many more early western (especially French) saints, posted by ‘Claude le liseur’ who I think is probably M Lopez-Ginisty of Acathistes et offices orthodoxes, at forum-orthodoxe.com
Posted by: anna | July 29, 2011

troparia for July 16

A quiet day on the British calendar; I’ve updated St Helier’s post with a troparion, and here are a couple  more for today from Acathistes et offices orthodoxes.

Ton 5 Tropaire à saint Domnin, martyr, (natalice au 3ème siècle)

L’Ecriture dit que la louange parfaite,*
Est issue de la bouche des petits enfants.*

Saint Domnin, tu n’étais âgé que de dix ans,*

Lorsque tu fus crucifié en haine du Christ,*

Avec d’autres chrétiens à Avrilly dans l’Eure.*
Saint innocent, prie le Seigneur de nous sauver!

Scripture says that perfect praise

Comes from the mouths of little children.

St Domninus, you were only ten years old

When you were crucified by those who hated Christ

With other Christians at Avrilly in the Eure, in Normandy.

Holy innocent, pray to the Lord to save us!

 
The relics of St Dominin were translated to Puy-en-Velay in the Auvergne.

+

 

Ton 6 Tropaire à saint Généroux, higoumène, (Natalice au 6ème siècle)

Romain de naissance, tu te fis religieux*

Au monastère sacré de saint Jouin de Marne.*

Tes éminentes qualités spirituelles,*

Te firent bientôt élire comme higoumène.*

Saint Généroux, toi qui es auprès du Seigneur,*

Prie-Le d’avoir de nos âmes grande mercy!

Roman by birth, you became a monk

At the holy monastery of St Jouin of Marne.

Your distinguished spiritual qualities

Soon caused you to be elected abbot.

St Generosus, you who are close to the Lord,

Pray to Him to have great mercy on our souls!

 
=====
 
celt-saints adds for today:
‘St. Sinach MacDara, 6th century. The only reference I can find to Sinach is that the fisherman traditionally gathered on the island of MacDara for an annual Mass. It is still customary to dip sails or make the Sign of Cross when passing the island (Montague).
‘St. Tenenan (Tininor) of Leon, Bishop. Born in Britain; died c. 635. Tenenan was a priest who became a hermit in Brittany and later bishop of Leon. He probably died at Ploabennec, where he had built a forest hermitage and where his relics were long venerated (Benedictines, Farmer).’
===
And another source, many more early western (especially French) saints, posted by ‘Claude le liseur’ who I think is probably M Lopez-Ginisty of Acathistes et offices orthodoxes, at forum-orthodoxe.com
Posted by: anna | July 28, 2011

St Edith, abbess of Polesworth

Today (15 July) in the calendar of early British saints we commemorate St. Edith (Editha, Eadgyth), abbess of Polesworth (ca. 925). Miss Dunbar separates out two Ediths who are conflated by other sources, so here they both are:
St. Edith (3), March 15. 871. First abbess of Polesworth, in Warwickshire. Daughter of Egbert, king of England (828-830). Sister of Ethelwolf. Aunt of Alfred the Great. Polesworth was one of two towns or estates granted by Etholwolf to ST. MODWENNA for monasteries. OSITHE and ATEA were nuns under Edith. Book of Hyde. Dugdale Monasticon i.197. Lives of the Women Saints of our Contrie of England.
St. Edith (4), July 15. Queen of Northumberland, l0th century. Eldest daughter of Edward the Elder, king of England (901-925). Her mother’s name was Egwenna, a beautiful lady whom Edward met at his nurse’s house, and who was the mother of his successor, Athelstane. In 920 Athelstane gave his sister Edith in marriage to Sithric, or Siric, king of the Danes in Northumberland, who was tributary to the English crown. Sithric died the following year. Edith became a nun at Polesworth, and died in the monastery she built at Tamworth. She was half-sister of Kings Edmund (940-940) and Edred (940-955), and of SS. EDBURGA (6) and ELFLEDA, a nun either at Rumsey or Wilton. Of her other half-sisters, one married Otho the Great, king of Germany and emperor, another was Queen of France, being the wife of Charles the Simple, and the three others made marriages nearly as illustrious. William of Malmesbury, De Gestis Pontificum. Book of Hyde. Stevenson, Church Hist. of England. Memorial of Ancient British Piety. Watson, Eng. Mart.

Holy Mother Edith, pray to God for us.
Posted by: anna | July 27, 2011

St Deusdedit

Today (14 July) in the calendar of early British saints we commemorate St. Deusdedit (Adeodatus), 6th archbishop of Canterbury (664). From Baring Gould:
S. ADEODATUS, ABP. OF CANTERBURY. (a.d. 664.) [Utrecht, German, Anglican, Benedictine Martyrologies. But Wilson on June 30th. Authorities: — Mention by Bede and Matthew of Westminster. Also a Life by Capgrave.]
S. Adeodatus, or Deusdedit, was elected archbishop of Dover or Canterbury, in 655, and was consecrated by Ithamar, bishop of Rochester. His name in Saxon was Frithom. Next to nothing was known of his acts. He died on July 15th, 664, and was buried in the monastery of SS. Peter and Paul at Canterbury.

Holy Father Deusdedit, pray to God for us.
Posted by: anna | July 26, 2011

St Dogfan of Dyfed

Today (13 July) in the calendar of early British saints we commemorate the Hieromartyr Dogfan (Doewan) of Dyfed (6th C). From Baring Gould & Fisher:
S. DOEWAN, Martyr
This Saint’s name occurs in the genealogies as Doewan, Dogwan, and Dogfan, and elsewhere also as Doewon, Doefon, Dwywan, Dwywon. In the later genealogies he is given as a son of Brychan Brycheiniog, but his name does not occur in either of the Cognatio versions. In the Calendars his name is always given as Doewan. He is not to be confounded, as is sometimes done, with Dyfan, of Lucius fame. He was slain by the pagan Saxons at Merthyr Dogwan, in Dyfed, where his church is, but its situation is not known, nor is it easy to understand how the Saxons had got into South-west Wales at that time.
He is the patron of Llanrhaiadr ym Mochnant, Denbighshire, which adjoins Llangynog, dedicated to his half-brother, Cynog, whose mother Banadlined or Banhadlwedd was probably a native of Llanrhaiadr. Local tradition points out a place called Buarth yr Hendre, in the parish, as the site of an old church, the site and graveyard of which are still visible. From the fact of its being in Cwm Doefon, and Ffynnon Ddoefon being in the same dell, it has been reasonably conjectured to have been the site of the original oratory founded by Doewan. The parish church name simply means ‘The Church near the waterfall in Mochnant’ (the commote).
His festival is entered against July 13 in a good number of Calendars of the fifteenth century and later. The Prymer of 1546 gives the 12th, no doubt in mistake. A great fair was held at Llanrhaiadr on his day (Old Style), and is still held on the 23rd and 24th.
The cloud-berries (Rubus Chamaemorus) http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Rubus_chamaemorus, growing on the more alpine parts of the Berwyn, in this parish, are popularly called Mwyar Doewan, his berries. They are also known as Mwyar Berwyn. They are mentioned in Camden’s Britannia among the ”rare plants growing in Wales,” Chamaemorus Cambro-britannica sive Lancastrense Vaccinium nubis.” There is a tradition that whoever brought a quart of them ripe to the parson on the morning of the day of the Saint’s festival, had his ecclesiastical payments remitted for the year.
====
Which is all to say that nothing whatever is actually known of his life. However, I am pleased to discover that cloudberries do grow in Britain.
  • St Dogfan’s church in Llanrhaeadr ym Mochnant has one of Wales’ many ancient stone crosses, or as in this case cross-inscribed stones.
  • nice local history trail guide about the church
  • not mentioned on celt-saints except misspelled as Dofgan
Saint Dogfan, pray to God for us.
Posted by: anna | July 25, 2011

Saints of 12 July

Today (12 July) the British calendar is quiet, so I’ve gone over to Acathistes et Offices Orthodoxes to collect today’s troparia:

Ton 1 Tropaire à saint Menou,évêque de Quimper,(Natalice au 7ème siècle)

Venu de la verte Hibernie en Bourbonnais,*
Tu as rencontré saint Corentin à Quimper,*
A sa mort, tu lui succédas comme hiérarque.*
Tu allas pérégriner aux lieux saints de Rome,*
Et tu naquis au Ciel sur la voie du retour.*
Saint Menou, prie Dieu pour le salut de nos âmes!
Troparion in Tone 1 to St Menulphus, Bishop of Quimper (+7th c)
Journeying from green Hibernia (Ireland, sic),
You met St Corentin at Quimper,
And at his death succeeded him as bishop.
You went on pilgrimage to the holy places of Rome,
And you were born into heaven (at Menoux in the Bourbonnais) on your return journey.
Saint Menulphus, pray to God for the salvation of our souls!
wikipedia in French
+

Ton 2 Tropaire à saint Balay, évêque de Lyon, (Natalice au 6ème siècle)
Tu étais seigneur de Rosmadeuc en Bretagne,*
Mais tu fis la rencontre de saint Guénolé,*
Chantre des richesses du monde à venir.*
Lors, tu quittas le monde pour Landévénec,*
Où tu es devenu moine pour le Seigneur.*
Saint Balay, prie-Le d’avoir pitié de nos âmes!
Troparion in Tone 2 to St Biabailus, bishop of Lyon (+6th c)
You were lord of Rosmadec in Brittany
But then you met St Winwaloe,
Proponent of the riches of the world to come.
You left the world for Landévennec
Where you became a monk for the Lord.
Saint Biabailus, pray to Him to have mercy on our souls!
brief Life in Norwegian – such are the complicated twists and turns of finding these things out, even in the age of the internet…

+
Ton 3 Tropaire à saint Juventiole,évêque de Lyon,(natalice au 6ème siècle)
Moine à l’école monastique de Condat,*
Où tu étais un enseignant de grand renom,*
Saint Avit, l’évêque de Vienne te manda*
Afin de créer son école épiscopale,*
Et il te fit nommer évêque de Lyon.*
Saint Juventiole, prie Dieu pour notre salut!
 
Troparion in Tone 3 to St Viventiolus, bishop of Lyon (+6th c)
Monk at the monastery school of Condat Abbey,
Where you were a teacher of great renown,
To establish his eipscopal school
and named you bishop of Lyon.
Saint Viventiolus, pray to God for our salvation!
Holy Fathers of the ancient see of Lyon, pray to God for us
and especially for the people and the land of France.
Posted by: anna | July 22, 2011

9 July

Today is very quiet on the calendar of early British saints, so I’ve updated a post about St Everilda from two years ago and thought I would share a couple of photos instead. We’ve been having unsummery weather for several weeks – overcast, warm, humid, frequent showers – and it’s so clammy my attempts to grow alfalfa sprouts keep going mouldy! Today for the first time in ages the sun is really shining, and my route to work this morning was so pretty I had to stop and take out the camera.

talk about getting your ducks in a row… well, ok, geese…
Posted by: anna | July 21, 2011

St Sunniva of Bergen

icons of St Sunniva and St Hallvard – in an Orthodox church of St Nicholas , somewhere in Norway! I took the image from here; WSIP doesn’t know where it comes from.
Today (8 July) in the calendar of early western saints we commemorate St Sunniva, patron of Bergen (10th century). From Miss Dunbar:
St. Sunniva, July 8 (SUMMINA, SUMMIVA, SUMNIVA, SUNIFA, SUNIFRA, SUNIVA, SlNEVO, SlNNEY,  SOMMINE SONNEVA, etc.), V. M. end of 10th century. Patron of Bergen. A princess, probably Irish, who to avoid marrying a heathen, fled from her native land with a considerable following. They were driven by a storm to the coast of Norway ; the natives attacked them and they again put to sea and landed on the island of Sello where they converted some of the inhabitants. Earl Hakon persecuted them and Sunniva prayed that the rocks might fall upon them : her prayer was answered. In 995 their remains were discovered and two churches were built on the island. In 1170 Sunniva was translated to Bergen. She has dedications in Orkney and Shetland. Report of the Cambridge Antiquarian Society, May, 1878. The Bollandists say that she was taken with seven companions by pirates to  Norway, where the innocence of their lives converted some of the natives to Christianity. The Rev. S. Baring Gould regards the legend as a variant of that of ST. URSULA. AASS. Greven, Auctaria. Metcalfe, Passio B. Olavi.
====
  • commemoration service composed by Reader Isaac Lambertson, on orthodoxengland. His compositions are beautiful, using acrostics and other poetic forms traditional in liturgical texts, and so often lost in translation.
  • A little about the life of Mother Mary, who now lives as an Orthodox monastic in St Sunniva Skete in the Shetlands
  • and a report on a visit to Norway by +Seraphim, Archbishop of Ottawa and Canada
  • There is a ferry named for her in the Shetlands – what a good idea! Ferries are a lifeline in small island communities, and they have to contend with all kinds of perils, so they could do with a patron saint. I also love that there is a Shetlopedia :)
Troparion from the above service:
Most blessed were the chaste royal virgin Sunniva and those who died with her,
for the King of kings, showing them His grace and favour,
in His compassion and loving-kindness delivered them from the hand of the infidel,
and made them to dwell with the saints and angels in paradise.
Glory to Him Who hath saved them!
Glory to Him Who hath crowned them!
Glory to Him Who worketh all-glorious wonders through His faithful martyrs!
Holy Sunniva, pray to God for us.

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